Broomfield is the highest village in the Quantock hills in Somerset, UK and one of the oldest settlements dating to prehistoric times. This site features the history of Broomfield through the research of Audrey Mead and Stephen Tierney and is a community project with contributions from resident families past and present. It reflects English history and village life through the ages to the present day. Submissions are welcome to sptierney6@hotmail.co.uk

"It is beautifully varied, with swelling hills and deep romantic vales, and commanding a great variety of pleasing landscapes and very extensive prospects. This parish has always been remarkably healthy, even in times of general sickness elsewhere"


You'll be able to explore Broomfield and learn about the electrical experiments of Andrew Crosse of Fyne Court, Discover the Olde names of fields across the parish and learn about the residents of Broomfield church yard  including a 20th century politician. Learn about the Roman Camp with a rumoured buried treasure with a curse!

There are tales of life long gone and so much more. If you are hoping to catch a bus here, there hasn't been one since 1936!!

There is a page for local community news and events under 'Community Chest'

While every effort is made to ensure details are accurate, there will be details that need correcting. If you spot any errors or have additional information to submit, please email Stephen Tierney at sptierney6@hotmail.co.uk 

Broomfield is a beautiful place to wander and, as you walk the quiet lanes, you experience a timeless quality whilst the village itself evokes images of a past age. Collinson, the Somerset historian, writing at the end of the eighteenth century, described Broomfield thus: "It is beautifully varied, with swelling hills and deep romantic vales, and commanding a great variety of pleasing landscapes and very extensive prospects. This parish has always been remarkably healthy, even in times of general sickness elsewhere" I cannot comment on the health of the current inhabitants, but the rest of the description remains true today. Broomfield was once famous for its annual fair held on All Saints day 1st November. For more than 600 years a Fair was held on the village green and in the Fair Field opposite, people came from miles around to sample of its delights. Sometime during the 1890s it ceased to be held, about the time that Fyne Court burnt down. Although this has always been a parish of isolated farms and lonely cottages scattered over 4 000 acres, the village has declined in size over the last 100 years. In the census for 1861 its population was recorded at over 500 but now only about 190 people live in the parish. During the last century less than 10 houses have been built and, of the earlier dwellings, over 30 now lie in ruins hidden by a tangle of brambles and ivy or have completely disappeared, their stone being used to mend existing buildings or farm roads. The church provides a centre for the village and only a few houses remain.